Jan 19 & 20, 2013 - Politics

Politics and baseball

WASHINGTON, D.C., As the nation gets ready to inaugurate President Barack Obama a second time, let's reminisce about politics and baseball.

Many of you know that former Kentucky Senator Jim Bunning is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. He was a dominant pitcher for most of his 17 years in the majors, mostly for the Detroit Tigers and Philadelphia Phillies. Finshed his career 224-184 with a 3.27 ERA. He is one of the few to throw no-hitters in both leagues.

Former New York Governor and presidential candidate Mario Cuomo had a promising baseball career cut short by a fastball. He was signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates organization in 1951 and assigned to their Brunswick minor league team. Later that first season he was hit in the head by a fastball. It was so serious doctors advised he give up baseball, which he did, and went on to finish law school.

The Chicago Cubs' dominance of baseball attention in the Windy City continues despite the White House being inhabited by a Sox fan. A fan, President Barack Obama, who did not worry about alienating fans of the city's north side team during the 2008 campaign. This is what he told ESPN when asked who he'd root for in a Sox-Cubs World Series, "Oh, that's easy. White Sox. I'm not one of these fair-weather fans. You go to Wrigley Field, you have a beer; beautiful people up there. People aren't watching the game. It's not serious. White Sox, that's baseball. South Side."

Former President George W. Bush was principal owner of the Texas Rangers. His father, former President George H. W. Bush played baseball for Yale.

What other baseball-politics connections can you think of?

Contributing sources: 
ESPN 
Mario Cuomo in the Minors